Magenresektion, subtotal, Typ Billroth II mit Roux-Y-Rekonstruktion

Sie haben keine Lizenz erworben - paywall ist aktiv: zur Produktauswahl
  • Universität Witten/Herdecke

    Prof. Dr. med. Gebhard Reiss

Einzelfreischaltung

Freischaltung auf diesen Lehrbeitrag
für 3 Tage

4,99 € inkl. MwSt.

payment

webop-Account Single

Freischaltung aller Lehrbeiträge
Preis pro Monat

für das Modul: Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie

ab 8,17 €

Kliniken & Bibliotheken

für das Modul: Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie

ab 390,00 Euro

  • Surgical anatomy of the stomach

    Paid content (image)

    In terms of function, the stomach mixes and stores food and is an expansion of the alimentary tract between the esophagus and the duodenum. This muscular hollow viscus produces acidic gastric juice (mucus and HCl) and enzymes, which predigest some elements of the ingested food, and portions the chyme into the duodenum.

    Usually, the stomach is located immediately inferior to the diaphragm in the left upper quadrant and medial epigastrium. Location, size and shape of the stomach vary from person to person and may differ substantially, depending on age, filling condition and body position. The moderately filled stomach has a mean length of 25-30 cm and can hold 1.5 liters, in extreme cases up to 2,5 liters.

    Within the abdominal cavity the stomach is held in position and stabilized by ligaments inserting at the liver and spleen Its convex aspect forms the major curvature (curvatura major gastrica) and its concave aspect the lesser curvature (curvatura minor gastrica). Its anterior wall is termed paries anterior gastrica and its posterior aspect paries posterior gastrica.

    Since the stomach is an intraperitoneal viscus, it is covered by the gastric serosa (tunica serosa gastrica), and only the posterior aspect of the cardia is free of serosa. Stomach rotation shifts the embryonic mesogastrics from their former sagittal position to a frontal location. The lesser omentum originates at the lesser curvature and extends to the hepatic portal, while the greater omentum originates at the greater curvature and courses to the transverse colon, spleen and diaphragm.

    The stomach displays the following portions:

    Entrance of stomach / Cardia / Ostium cardiacum:
    The superior opening of the stomach, where the esophagus enters the stomach, is 1-2 cm long. It is characterized by a marked transition from the mucosa of the esophagus to that of the stomach.

    Gastric fundus / fundus gastricus:
    Superior to the level of entrance of the esophagus the fundus arches cephalad, which then is called gastric fornix (fornix gastricus). Usually, the fundus is full of air which is swallowed automatically when ingesting food. In the erect position the fundus is the highest point of the stomach, and on abdominal films its trapped air is evident as the “gastric bubble”. A notch (incisura cardialis) clearly delimits the fundus from the entrance of the stomach.

    Body of the stomach / Corpus gastricum
    The main portion of the stomach is taken up by the gastric body. The deep mucosal folds (plicae gastricae) found here extend from the cardia to the pylorus and are also known as “magenstrasse”.

    Pylorus / Pars pylorica:
    This portion begins with the extended pyloric antrum, followed by the pyloric canal, and terminates at the actual pylorus. It is formed by the pyloric sphincter (m. sphincter pyloricus), a strong circular layer of muscle which closes off the inferior gastric orifice (ostium pyloricum). The pylorus closes off the gastric outlet and periodically lets some of the chyme pass into the adjacent duodenum.

  • Layers and structure of the gastric wall

    Gastric wall

    Under the microscope the gastric wall displays a characteristic layered structure with the following sequence from the inside out:

    • The internal aspect of the gastric wall is lined by mucosa (tunica mucosa). The gastric mucosa is made up of three sublayers: The lamina epithelialis mucosae produces viscous neutral mucus which protects the gastric mucosa against mechanical, thermal and enzymatic injury. This is followed by the loose connective tissue coat of the lamina propria mucosae into which the gastric glands (glandulae gastricae) descend. The outermost layer of the mucosa is the small lamina muscularis mucosae which can change the relief of the mucosa.
    • The gastric mucosa is followed by a loose layer of connective tissue (tela submucosa gastrica), which houses not only a dense network of blood and lymph vessels but also a nerve plexus (plexus submucosus or Meissner plexus) which controls gastric secretion. Although this plexus is independent of the central nervous system (CNS), the latter may affect the former via the autonomic nervous system.
    • Next is the marked tunica muscularis with its three sublayers, each comprising muscle fibers coursing in different directions: The inner layer of small oblique muscle fibers (fibrae obliquae), then a circular layer (stratum circulare) and finally the outermost longitudinal layer of muscle fibers (stratum longitudinale). These muscles effect the peristalsis of the stomach and ensure thorough mixing of the chyme with the gastric juice. Muscular function is controlled by a nerve plexus, the plexus myentericus or Auerbach plexus, in between the circular and longitudinal layers. Just like the plexus submucosus, this plexus is mostly autonomous but is also affected by the autonomic nervous system.
    • Next is another layer of loose connective tissue (tela subserosa gastrica).
    • The peritoneum (tunica serosa) covering the external aspect of the stomach is its final layer.

    Gastric glands

    The gastric glands (glandulae gastricae) located in the fundus and body of the stomach are part of the lamina propria mucosae. 1 mm2 of mucosal surface comprises up to 100 such glands. The ductal wall of the gland is lined with different types of cells:

    • Mucous cells: They produce the same neutral mucus as the epithelial cells.
    • Surface mucous cells: Foveolar cells are close to the surface of the gland and contain alkaline mucus, i.e., the pH of its hydrogen carbonate ions (HCO3–) is rather high. This property is rather important in controlling the gastric pH. The mucus lines the gastric mucosa and protects it against autodigestion by the aggressive hydrochloric acid (HCl) and enzymes as autodigesting proteins. This type of cells is mostly found in the cardia and fundus of the stomach.
    • Chief cells: These cells produce the inactive proenzyme pepsinogen which, once released, is activated by hydrochloric acid (HCl) to the active enzyme pepsin, the latter starting the digestion of the alimentary proteins. Since the initial contact of the enzyme with hydrochloric acid is at the surface of the gland, this ensures that the glands will not be autodigested by the enzyme. This type of cells is mostly found in the body of the stomach.
    • Parietal cells: Mostly found in the body of the stomach, these cells produce plenty of hydrogen ions (H+) needed in the production of hydrochloric acid (HCl). The latter has a rather low pH of 0.9-1.5. In addition, the parietal cells also produce the so-called intrinsic factor. Together with vitamin B12 from the ingested food this substance generates a complex in the small intestine which can pass through the intestinal wall. This vitamin plays a pivotal role in erythropoiesis (gastric resection may result in anemia).
    • G cells: Primarily found in the gastric antrum, these cells produce gastrin which increases HCl production in the parietal cells.
  • Function

    The stomach acts as a reservoir for ingested food. Since it may store food for hours, it ensures that we can meet our daily nutritional requirements with a few major meals. Peristalsis thoroughly mixes the chyme with the gastric juice, the food is broken up chemically, predigested and then portioned into the duodenum.

  • Arterial and venous blood supply, innervation

    Paid content (image)

    The arteries supplying the stomach all arise from the unpaired celiac trunk, comprise numerous anastomoses with each other and course as arterial arcades along the gastric curvatures:

    • Right gastric artery arising from the hepatic artery proper and supplying the inferior portion of the lesser curvature
    • Left gastric artery supplying the superior portion of the lesser curvature
    • Short gastric arteries arising from the splenic artery and supplying the fundus
    • Right gastro-omental artery arising from the gastroduodenal artery and supplying the inferior (right) portion of the greater curvature
    • Left gastro-omental artery arising from the splenic artery and supplying the left portion of the greater curvature
    • Posterior gastric artery arising from the splenic artery and supplying the posterior gastric wall.

    This way, the stomach is supplied along the lesser curvature by an arterial arcade between the left and right gastric artery and along the greater curvature by another arcade between the left and right gastro-omental artery.

    The 4 major veins parallel the arterial blood supply along both curvatures of the stomach. They unite to collecting veins (left and right gastric vein draining directly into the hepatic portal vein; left gastro-omental vein and the short gastric veins drain into the splenic vein; while the right gastro-omental vein drains into the superior mesenteric vein) which all drain into the portal vein.

    While gastric innervation is primarily controlled by the autonomic nervous system, there are also sensory fibers: The sympathetic nervous system innervates the pyloric muscles, while the parasympathetic nervous system (vagus nerve, CN X) supplies the other gastric muscles and the gastric glands. The vagus parallels the esophagus on the left and right and passes through the esophageal hiatus in the diaphragm; on the left side it then reaches the anterior gastric wall (t. vagalis anterior), while on the right side it innervates the posterior wall of the stomach (t. vagalis posterior). The afferent signals from sensory fibers of the stomach, on the other hand, pass via the greater splanchnic nerve to the thoracic spinal ganglia.

  • Lymphatic drainage

    Paid content (image)

    Lymphatic drainage of the stomach parallels its arterial and venous blood supply:

    • The lymphatics of the lesser curvature parallel the left / right gastric artery and drain into the left / right gastric lymph nodes
    • The lymphatics from the gastric fundus parallel the splenic artery and drain into the splenic lymph nodes
    • The lymphatics from the greater curvature parallel the suspension of the greater omentum and drain into the left / right gastro-omental lymph nodes
    • The lymphatics from the pyloric region drain into the pyloric lymph nodes.

    From these lymph nodes mentioned above the lymph then drains into the celiac nodes, the superior mesenteric nodes and the thoracic duct.
    Since the pancreatic lymph nodes are another pathway for lymph drainage, tumors of the stomach may very well metastasize into the pancreas. One special sign of gastric cancer is the frequent prominent supraclavicular lymph node of the left lateral region of the neck (Virchow / signal node) which signals advanced metastasis.

    For reasons of surgical technique, the lymph node stations are grouped into 3 compartments:

    • Compartment I (LN stations 1-6): All lymph node directly at the stomach; paracardiac (station 1+2), along the lesser and greater curvature (station 3+4), suprapyloric and infrapyloric (station 5+6).
    • Compartment II (LN station 7-11): Lymph nodes along the major vessels: Left gastric artery (station 7), common hepatic artery (station 8), celiac trunk (station 9), splenic hilum (station 10), splenic artery (station 11).
    • Compartment III (LN station 12-16): Lymph nodes at the hepatoduodenal ligament (station 12), posterior to the pancreatic head (station 13), at the mesenteric root and the mesentery (station 14+15) and along the abdominal aorta (station 16).

Einzelfreischaltung

Freischaltung auf diesen Lehrbeitrag
für 3 Tage

4,99 € inkl. MwSt.

payment

webop-Account Single

Freischaltung aller Lehrbeiträge
Preis pro Monat

für das Modul: Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie

ab 8,17 €

Kliniken & Bibliotheken

für das Modul: Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie

ab 390,00 Euro

  • Indikationen

    Paid content (text)
  • Kontraindikationen

    Paid content (text)
  • Präoperative Diagnostik

    Paid content (text)
  • Spezielle Vorbereitung

    Paid content (text)
  • Aufklärung

    Paid content (text)
  • Anästhesie

    Paid content (text)
  • Lagerung

    Paid content (image)
    Paid content (text)
  • OP-Setup

    Paid content (image)
    Paid content (text)
  • Spezielle Instrumentarien und Haltesysteme

    Paid content (image)
    Paid content (text)
  • Postoperative Behandlung

    Paid content (text)
  • Zugang

    145-6

    Eröffnung des Abdomens durch einen Oberbauchmedianschnitt, der mit einer Linksumschneidung des Nabels nach kaudal verlängert wird. Nach Einsetzen von Bauchdeckenretraktror und -spreizer erfolgt die Exploration der Bauchhöhle mit Beurteilung von Sitz und Ausdehnung des Primärtumors, des Lymphknotenbefalls und von Organmetastasen.

  • Ablösung des großen Netzes; Absetzen der gastroepiploischen Gefäße

    145-7

    Das Omentum majus wird hochgeschlagen und mit dosiertem Zug gegen das Colon transversum angespannt. Das Omentum majus wird unmittelbar am Oberrand des Querkolons abpräpariert und die Bursa omentalis eröffnet.
    Nach Mobilisierung der rechten Kolonflexur und der Pars descendens duodeni, so wie vorsichtigem Trennen des rechtsseitig mit dem Mesocolon verklebten großen Netzes, erfolgt die Absetzung der hier eintretenden gastroepiploischen Gefäße. Dabei wird die V. gastroepiploica dextra vor der Mündung in die V. mesenterica sup. und die gleichnamige Arterie am Abgang aus der A. gastroduodenalis durchtrennt.

  • Lymphadenektomie I (Lig. hepatoduodenale/Station 12 und 13)

    145-8

    Die Lymphadenektomie (LAD) beginnt am Leberhilus, umfasst das Lig. hepatoduodenale und wird entlang der A. hepatica communis bis zum Truncus coeliacus fortgesetzt.

    Nach Durchführung der Cholecystektomie, auf deren Darstellung hier verzichtet wird, erfolgt mit bipolarer Schere die lebernahe Inzision des Omentum minus, die linkslateral des Lig. hepatoduodenale beginnt und bis in Höhe der Kardia fortgeführt wird. Anheben des Bindegewebes mitsamt der darin enthalten Lymphknoten (LK) über der A. hepatica communis am linken Rand des Lig. hepatoduodenale mittels Pinzette und Darstellung der Arterie. Schrittweises Lösen des LK-Gewebebündels (Station 12) über der V. portae und dem Ductus choledochus. Durch Einführen des Zeigefingers in das Foramen Winslowii können mit Daumen und Zeigefinger die Aa. hepatica communis et propria, V.portae und ggf. suspekte Lymphknoten palpiert werden. Dann Ausräumen der LK-Station 13 zwischen Pankreaskopf und V. cava.

  • Lymphadenektomie II (A. hepatica communis/Station 8)

    145-9

    Die A. gastrica dextra wird zwischen Overholtklemmen durchtrennt und ligiert. Nach Anschlingen der A. hepatica propria wird das LK-Gewebebündel (Station 8) nach kraniomedial gezogen und schrittweise mittels der bipolaren Schere entlang der A. hepatica communis in Richtung auf den Truncus coeliacus in toto abpräpariert, wobei die Dissektion unmittelbar an der Adventitia der Gefäße erfolgen muss, da die Lymphknoten dieser anliegen. Das Anschlingen der A. hepatica communis mit einem Vessel- Loop vereinfacht die Präparation. Die dorsale Grenze der LK-Dissektion ist die Vorderseite der V.cava inferior.

  • Lymphadenektomie III (Truncus coeliacus/Station 9)

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)

    Die Abgänge der A. hepatica communis und der A. lienalis aus dem Truncus coeliacus werden wie vorbeschrieben dargestellt und vom LK-Gewebebündel befreit. Mit dem stammnahen Absetzen der A. gastrica sinistra und der Abgabe des LK-Gewebebündels ist die LAD komplett. Der Ursprung des Tr. coeliacus und die Aorta werden nicht freipräpariert.

  • Absetzen des Magens

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)

    Durch eine an der großen Kurvatur angelegten Organfasszange wird der Magen dosiert nach kranial gezogen, sodass Milz und Lig. gastrolienale gut zugänglich sind. Verklebungen zur Milz hin werden mittels bipolarer Schere gelöst.
    Linksseitiges Durchtrennen des Lig. gastrocolicum bis zur proximalen Resektionsgrenze. Hier Durchtrennen der gastroepiploischen Arkade, dabei sichere Schonung der Vasa gastrica brevia.
    Festlegen der Resektionsgrenze kleinkurvaturseitig 2 cm distal der Kardia.
    Maschinelles Absetzen des Magens mit geraden Klammerschneidegeräten (im Filmbeispiel werden wiederverwendbare Geräte mit Magazinlängen von 50 und 90 mm verwendet).

  • Absetzen des Duodenums

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)

    Anzügeln des proximalen Duodenums ca. 2 cm distal des Pylorus und Absetzen mit einem geraden Klammerschneidegerät (50 mm).

  • Dissektion der Verklebungen zum Pankreas; Entnahme des Präparates

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)

    Im Filmbeispiel ist der Tumor im Bereich der Magenhinterwand mit der Pankreaskapsel und dem Mesocolon transversum adhärent. Diese Adhäsionen müssen vorsichtig präpariert werden und verbleiben am Präparat. Dabei darf einerseits das Pankreas nicht verletzt, andererseits muss der Tumor im Gesunden entfernt werden. Schließlich kann das Resektat geborgen werden.

    Bemerkung: Im Filmbeispiel handelt es sich um entzündliche Verklebungen in der Umgebung des Tumors, die eine Mitresektion von Pankreaskapsel und Anteilen des Mesocolon transversum notwendig machen.

  • Verschluss des Mesokolonschlitzes, Übernähen der Klammernahtreihen

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)

    Verschluss des Mesoschlitzes im Bereich des C. transversum mittels einer fortlaufenden Naht. Anschließend Übernähung der Klammernahtreihe des Duodenalstumpfs durch eine einstülpende, fortlaufende Naht mit PDS 4-0. Die Klammernahtreihe am Magenstumpf wird in gleicher Weise übernäht. Sie beginnt an der kleinen Kurvatur, endet jedoch ca. 6 cm vor Erreichen der großen Kurvatur. Dieser Anteil an der großen Kurvatur verbleibt für die Anastomose. Nach dem Knüpfen des Fadens wird das freie Fadenende mit einem Klemmchen armiert ,um es später zur Herstellung der Gastroenteroanastomose zu verwenden (s. Schritt 10).

  • Präparation der Roux-Y-Schlinge

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)

    Ca. 30 cm aboral der Flexura duodenojejunualis (Treitz´sches Band) Auswahl einer Jejunalschlinge unter Diaphanoskopie der Gefäßarkaden. Gefäßfreie Anteile des Mesos werden mit dem Kauter durchtrennt und die kreuzenden Gefäße zwischen Klemmen abgesetzt und mit Durchstichligaturen versorgt (PDS 4-0). Durchtrennung des Darms mit dem Klammerschneidegerät. Die Klammernahtreihe der abführenden Schlinge wird wie in Schritt 8 beschrieben übernäht (nicht dargestellt).

    Tipps:

    • Die Durchtrennungslinie des Mesenteriums muss sowohl die Durchblutung des Darmes als auch eine ausreichende Länge der zur Gastrojejunostomie in den Oberbauch verlagerten abführenden Jejunumschlinge gewährleisten.
    • Sollten keine kräftigen Stammgefäße und keine durchgehend ausgebildete Randarkade erkennbar sein, können die benachbarten Stammgefäße mit Bulldog-Klemmchen temporär ausgeklemmt werden. Dadurch lässt sich prüfen, ob durch das ausgewählte Stammgefäß eine ausreichende Durchblutung der Jejunalschlinge gewährleistet ist.
    • Vorsicht bei adipösen Patienten! Bei fettreichem Mesenterium kann die Diaphanoskopie erschwert sein. Die Durchtrennung des Mesenteriums sollte vorsichtig und schrittweise erfolgen, um die Durchblutung des Darmes nicht zu gefährden.
    • Bei nicht ausreichender Durchblutung muss nachreseziert werden!
  • Terminolaterale Gastrojejunostomie, antekolisch: Hinterwandnaht I

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)
    Paid content (text)
  • Terminolaterale Gastrojejunostomie, antekolisch: Hinterwandnaht II

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)
    Paid content (text)
  • Terminolaterale Gastrojejunostomie, antekolisch: Vorderwandnaht I

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)
    Paid content (text)
  • Terminolaterale Gastrojejunostomie, antekolisch: Vorderwandnaht II

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)
    Paid content (text)
  • Terminolaterale Jejunojejunostomie („Roux-Y-Rekonstruktion“) I

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)
    Paid content (text)
  • Terminolaterale Jejunojejunostomie („Roux-Y-Rekonstruktion“) II

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)
    Paid content (text)
  • Bauchdeckenverschluss

    Paid content (video)
    Paid content (image)
    Paid content (text)

Einzelfreischaltung

Freischaltung auf diesen Lehrbeitrag
für 3 Tage

4,99 € inkl. MwSt.

payment

webop-Account Single

Freischaltung aller Lehrbeiträge
Preis pro Monat

für das Modul: Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie

ab 8,17 €

Kliniken & Bibliotheken

für das Modul: Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie

ab 390,00 Euro

  • Prophylaxe und Management intraoperativer Komplikationen

    Paid content (text)
  • Prophylaxe und Management postoperativer Komplikationen

    Paid content (text)
  • MVZ St. Marien Köln - Ärztliche Leiterin

    Edith Leisten

Einzelfreischaltung

Freischaltung auf diesen Lehrbeitrag
für 3 Tage

4,99 € inkl. MwSt.

payment

webop-Account Single

Freischaltung aller Lehrbeiträge
Preis pro Monat

für das Modul: Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie

ab 8,17 €

Kliniken & Bibliotheken

für das Modul: Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie

ab 390,00 Euro

  • Zusammenfassung der Literatur

    Paid content (text)
  • Aktuell laufende Studien zu diesem Thema

    Paid content (text)
  • Literatur zu diesem Thema

    Paid content (text)
  • Reviews

    Paid content (text)
  • Guidelines

    Paid content (text)
  • Literatursuche

    Literatursuche unter: http://www.pubmed.com